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Sunday, April 20, 2014

Best Athletes Diet Plan

How Much Carbohydrate is Needed?

Do you know? How much different is an athlete’s diet from any other normal person’s eating habits? How to enhance athletic performance? What is the best diet for an Athlete? Perhaps these questions race through your minds while watching athletes potentially dashing across playing fields or TV shots—be it track events, soccer, football, basketball, cricket, racing, hockey, weightlifting or swimming. Let’s consider a look at how much and how many carbohydrates (A form of energy) an athlete needs to include in the diet every day to stay on top form for peak performance.
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Based on scientific research, a healthy adult athlete requires 5 to 7g of carbohydrate per kilogram body weight, while a normal individual requires 7 to 10g of carbohydrate per kg body weight and each gram of carbohydrate produces only 4 units of calories (energy). Such a huge amount of carbohydrate is required by an athlete because it promotes several basic roles in the body such as providing energy for regular working muscles, to the central nervous system (Brain), enhancing the metabolism of fat for production of energy and preventing protein from being utilized for calories (energy). These functions are directly proportional to the top performance of a health athlete.
food sources of Carbohydrates such as grains, fresh fruits, milk and its products. Fresh vegetables contain a very small amount of carbohydrates. Just after digestion carbohydrates enter the blood stream in the form of glucose (energy) and glucose that is not utilized through body, is stored in the form of glycogen in the muscular tissues and liver. During exercise or hard work the blood glucose is utilized first and then only next the glycogen stores are tapped into.
Glucose is the exclusive energy compound for the central nervous system because it fuels our nerve cells. Dizziness, weakness, physical and mental fatigue are experienced when there is a lack of carbohydrate during exercise or hard work because of the low levels of glucose (energy).
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However, your body can store only 2000 calories worth of glucose (body fuel) in the form of glycogen and this is the only reason why carbohydrate is known as the limiting fuel in physical performance.
Simple carbohydrates in the diet are for examples of food containing simple sugars are candy, soda, sugar and milk.
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Complex carbohydrates in the diet take much longer to be digested in the body, for examples of complex carbohydrates are bread, pasta, grains, grams, fresh fruits and vegetables. The fiber components in these foods are what cause very slow digestion.
How much Carbohydrate is needed Pre, during and Post Workout?
Carbohydrate needs for an individual vary for different sports. An endurance event will need more energy than a short duration event. Type of carbohydrate to be given can be determined by its glycemic index.

What is Glycemic Index (GI)? Low GI Multigrain breads, brown rice, egg, fish, meat, chicken, prunes, figs, milk, most fruits and vegetables except potato, watermelon, grapes
Medium GI Whole wheat, sweet potato
High GI Sugar, chocolate, rice flakes, rice, white rice, potatoes, white bread
Recent Trends in Carbohydrate Requirements for Physical Activity
No doubt that carbohydrates are an essential source of energy for an healthy athlete to perform peak well. There is evidence of the benefits of carbohydrates on exercise (or hard work) lasting longer than 90 minutes. However, some studies and researches have also proved good performance in endurance activity after adapting to a low carbohydrate diet. But if it is a very short duration intense exercise like sprinting, studies and recent researches have shown that performance suffered on a low carbohydrate diet.
Recent studies and researches proved, when planning a diet for an healthy athlete, carbohydrates should be moderated whether in the form of food or sports drinks based on the 5-7g/kg body weight or 7-10g/ kg body weight requirement for adults or the 6-9 g/kg body weight for healthy male children and 3-5.5 g/kg body weight for healthy female children.
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It has been proved that carbohydrates provide energy (calories) for day to day activities and also for exercise. You will find a wide range of carbohydrate foods to choose from, depending on the healthy athlete’s needs. While making food choices fiber content, glycemic index, type of sugar and time of consumption must be taken into consideration for the best results on the field.

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Thanx for your valuable openion.